Nov 23, 2017

Search

03761

Last Name
MIDDELMANN
First Name
Udo W.
Title
Neither Necessary nor Inevitable: 'History Needn't Have Been Like That'
Publisher
Wipf & Stock Publishers
Year
2011
Group
PMO6 MOH2 GHT1
Comments
Amazon Review/s
Contents: No right side of history -- How it all happened? -- The reflection of nature in cultures -- The weight of significance -- Weighty consequences of our choices -- History in the seat of the accused.
Excerpts of Reviews: "This brilliant treatment deals with a difficult and often misunderstood subject of the relationship between man's choices and God's plan. Middelmann distinguishes himself by offering a compelling argument grounded in the notion of form and freedom that strikes a proper balance between God's purposes and man's freedom. He argues persuasively that man's free choices actually contribute to the shape of human history but always within the form of God's overall plan. Appreciatively, Middelmann does this while avoiding any notion of open theism." (Bruce A. Little) "Finally, a much needed intellectual tonic to help us decipher the strains of ancient Hellenic and Religious pluralism that cloud the moral framework of historic Judaic-Christianity. Udo Middelmann unpacks the loss of historical engagement and moral will in much theological thinking, aiming to recover the agency and dignity of the believer and the infinite-personal God for our times." (Mike T. Sugimoto) “Finally someone skillfully challenges the widely held assumption that “everything happens for a reason” as if guided by an unseen hand. Years of work in the former Soviet Union demonstrate the sad reality of what a fatalistic mindset can do to a people and a nation. The events of life are assumed to be both necessary and inevitable with disastrous consequences both personally and nationally. Udo Middelmann provides insight and thoughtful consideration to the reality that our choices not only matter, but are indeed history-making” (Jesse L. James) "Life and history are not mapped out for us by God; providence is not fatalism. Our decisions and choices matter, for good or for ill. Here is clear, logical, Biblically informed thought, laced with dashes of humor, which consistently argues the point that God created humankind to make a difference in this world and that with the choices we make, we do--one way or the other. Christian pastors, counselor, teacher and other leaders will especially appreciate the way Middleman has dismantled the mantra of misguided and ill-informed people who retreat to the opium of 'God has a plan for my life,' when tragedy or hardship strike one's life. God does clearly have a plan for our lives. It is called faithfulness. Neither Necessary nor Inevitable is about the importance of making such choices, not only for ourselves, but for the world over which God has given us dominion." (Fred R. Anderson)

=>« 03760 · Edit Form · 03762 »